Friday, November 15, 2019

CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC – REPUBLIQUE CENTRAFRICAINE
Centre-Afrique – Danses de la Forêt – Harmonia Mundi – HM 733, recorded by Simha Arom, 1967 (LP)
#Central African Republic #République Centrafricaine #CAR #Simha Arom #African music #Musique Africaine #traditional music #world music #Ba-Benzele Pygmies #trance #ceremony #ritual #ceremony #magic #Dakpa #Banda #Gbannou Langba #Dendi #Lito #Mandja #Ngkaba #Rounga #Sabanga
#Central African Republic #République Centrafricaine #CAR #Simha Arom #African music #Musique Africaine #traditional music #world music #Ba-Benzele Pygmies #trance #ceremony #ritual #ceremony #magic #Dakpa #Banda #Gbannou Langba #Dendi #Lito #Mandja #Ngkaba #Rounga #Sabanga
#Central African Republic #République Centrafricaine #CAR #Simha Arom #African music #Musique Africaine #traditional music #world music #Ba-Benzele Pygmies #trance #ceremony #ritual #ceremony #magic #Dakpa #Banda #Gbannou Langba #Dendi #Lito #Mandja #Ngkaba #Rounga #Sabanga
#Central African Republic #République Centrafricaine #CAR #Simha Arom #African music #Musique Africaine #traditional music #world music #Ba-Benzele Pygmies #trance #ceremony #ritual #ceremony #magic #Dakpa #Banda #Gbannou Langba #Dendi #Lito #Mandja #Ngkaba #Rounga #Sabanga

This thrilling anthology of traditional music from the Central African Republic of a bygone era, includes vocal and flute polyphony of the Ba-Benzele Pygmies (A3, A12, A8), Dakpa horn music (A6, A8, A10), and music from the Ngkaba (A1, B2, B11) Lito (B4, B5, B7) Langba (A5, A11, B6), Sabanga (A2, A13, B3), Mandjia (B1,B9), Dendi (A4) and Rounga (B10) people.

Cette anthologie palpitante de musiques traditionnelles centrafricaines d’antan présente la polyphonie vocale des pygmées Ba-Benzélé (A3, A12, A8), la musique de trompes Dakpa (A6, A8, A10), ainsi que les musiques Ngkaba (A1, B2, B11), Lito (B4, B5, B7), Langba (A5, A11, B6), Sabanga (A2, A13, B3), Mandjia (B1, B9), Dendi (A4) et Rounga (B10).

A1 Ngkaba Lament - Siti Oh (South-West)
A2 Sabanga Men's Dance – Angwora (Centre)
A3 Music Of Rejoicing of the Ba-Benzele (South-West)
A4 Dendi Lament (South)
A5 Langba Lullaby - Di Koukou Sya Liya (South)
A6 Dakpa Horn Music (Centre)
A7 Gbannou Initiation Song - Yakoyo (South-West)
A8 Dakpa Horn Music 2 (Centre)
A9 Ngkaba Satirical Song - Kouda-e (South-West)
A10 Dakpa Horn Music 3 (Centre)
A11 Langba Song Of Fear - Ya, Ya, Timiki (South)
A12 Ba-Benzele Pygmy Hunting Song - Hindewhou Whistle (South-West)
A13 Sabanga Mourning Song - Nawe (Centre)
B1 Mandjia Lullaby - Yokolo Be (West)
B2 Ngbaka Sanza Solo (South-West)
B3 Sabanga Lullaby - Egbole Ne Ma (Centre)
B4 Lito Children's Games - Malanga Ti Yourou (Centre)
B5 Lito Song Of Initiation - E Malangao (Centre)
B6 Langba Song of Rejoicing - Amokondzi Nzapa La Pa (South)
B7 Patri Burial Song - Mi Yola Mona Ndeyo (South)
B8 Ba-Benzele Pygmies' Lament - Yimbo (South-West)
B9 Mandja Fetishistic Song - Seto (West)
B10 Rounga Funeral Song - Ya Yao (North)
B11 Ngkaba Musical-Bow Solo (South-West)

For half a century the eminent Franco-Israeli ethnomusicologist Simha Arom (b. 1930) explored and recorded the music of many Central African peoples, notably the fascinating Pygmy polyphony, as well as music from Benin, Ethiopia, Greece and Georgia.

"I believe that the heart of the work in the strange field called ethnomusicology consists of collecting different types of orally-transmitted musics before they disappear and decipher them like a linguist would with a newly discovered language," said Arom.


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Our other Central African music share:
Musique Centrafricaine - Ocora 43, 1962 here

Our many thanks to Nuno for always making the visuals look fabulous!


Photograph below is from Le Corps Africain by Alain-Michel Boyer, Hazan, 2007:

Ganza ceremony with Banda boys, covered in white and holding symbolic whips, 
dancing to the sound of a wooden-horn orchestra, Bambari, 1925:

MusicRepublic CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC – REPUBLIQUE CENTRAFRICAINE  Centre-Afrique – Danses de la Forêt – Harmonia Mundi – HM 733

Please help me purchase important traditional records to pursue my global curation            project and share the best finds with you on this blog:




Saturday, November 9, 2019

KOREA (SOUTH)
National Classical Music Institute conducted by Kim Ki Soo – Jigu Records (Seoul),
 (3 LPs)
#Korean# Korea #traditional music #Gugak #world music #Kim Ki Soo #shamanic #poetry #National Classical Institute #Confucius #abstract

This collection of discs is an excellent introduction to Gugak (국악), the rich and fascinating traditional music of Korea, which encompasses folk and court music, poetic songs, and religious shamanistic/animist and Buddhist music.

According to Jungeun Oh, "A Korean traditional orchestra has a similar organization to that of Western orchestras. Like a Western symphony orchestra, the new type of Korean traditional orchestra requires a conductor… KiSoo Kim (1917-1986) composed the first new traditional orchestra piece, HwangHwaManNyunJiKok, in 1940... After Kim composed this piece, Korean new traditional music did not show real signs of vitalization until the 1960’s. In the 1960’s, when its composers became more active, Korean new traditional music was one of the spheres where dramatic modernizing efforts were taking place."*

The expressive and abstract music here features a variety of musical formats, from instrumental solos (C3, D1, D2) to royal court Orchestra (B1), Confucian Ceremonial Music (C1), and poetry (E1, F1):

Cette collection de trois disques est une excellente introduction au Gugak (국악), la riche et fascinante musique traditionnelle coréenne, qui englobe la musique folklorique et la musique de cour, les chansons poétiques ainsi que les musiques religieuses chamaniques/animistes et bouddhistes.

Selon Jungeun Oh, « un orchestre traditionnel coréen a une organisation similaire à celle des orchestres occidentaux. À l'instar des orchestres symphoniques occidentaux, les nouveaux orchestres traditionnels coréens sont dirigés par un chef d'orchestre… KiSoo Kim (1917-1986) fut le premier à composer un morceau néo-traditionnel orchestral HwangHwaManNyunJiKok, en 1940.... Mais la nouvelle musique traditionnelle coréenne ne connaîtra un véritable essor qu'à partir des années 1960, lorsqu'elle entama une modernisation spectaculaire. »*

Ces musiques expressives et abstraites présentent une grande variété de formats musicaux, allant de solos instrumentaux (C3, D1, D2) à un orchestre de cour royale (B1), une cérémonie confucéenne (C1) à de la poésie (E1, F1).

A1 Woodwind Music – Gyeong Pung Nyeon
A2 Chamber Music – Cheon Nyeon Man Se
A3 Trio – Heon Cheon Soo
B1 Royal Court Orchestra – Nak Yang Choon
B2 Woodwind Music – Ham Ryeong Ji Gok
B3 Chamber Music – Yeo Min Rak
C1 Confucian Ceremonial Music – Eung An Ji Ak
C2 Royal Ancestral Shrine – Jeon Pye Hee Moon
C3 Daegeum Bamboo Transverse Flute Solo – Cheong Seong Ja Jin Han Ip
D1 Piri Double Reed Solo – San Jo
D2 Tungso Vertical Bamboo Flute Solo – San Jo
E1 Gasa (poetry) – Soo Yang San Ga
F1 Sijo (poetry) – Yeok Eum Ji Reum Si Jo
F2 Gagok (Vocal) – U Jo Sam Soo

Some 25 years ago, I met a contemporary classical music composer with a remarkable collection of LPs. He generously let me take out all the records I wanted to record them at home. In addition to precious Karlheinz Stockhausen and Minimal music LPs, etc., I found a few traditional 
East Asian records, including this 3 LP gem from Korea. I’ve been looking in vain for a copy since and have yet to even find an online trace of it. If by chance someone has this album, I would much appreciate including a scan of the front cover and more info on the music in this post.


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Photographs are from L'Art Coréen au Musée Guimet by Pierre Cambon, RMN, 2001, Visages d'Asie by Bernard Dupaigne, Hazan, 2001, and Primitivism in 20th Century Art: Affinity of the Tribal and the Modern by William Rubin, MoMA, 1987:


Thousand-armed bodhisattva Avalokitesvara, Chonsu Kwanum Posal (above):


Mask:

#Korean# Korea #traditional music #Gugak #world music #Kim Ki Soo #shamanic #poetry #National Classical Institute #Confucius #abstract

Korean dignitary, c. 1900:

#Korean# Korea #traditional music #Gugak #world music #Kim Ki Soo #shamanic #poetry #National Classical Institute #Confucius #abstract

Roadside Divinity (291 cm/9.5 ft):

#Korean# Korea #traditional music #Gugak #world music #Kim Ki Soo #shamanic #poetry #National Classical Institute #Confucius #abstract


Please help me purchase important traditional records to pursue my global curation            project and share the best finds with you on this blog:




Thursday, October 31, 2019

INDIA – INDE
Bhimsen Joshi – Raag Lalit and Raag Shush-Kalyan – His Master's Voice – ECLP 2264, 1961 (LP)
#India #Bimsen Joshi #Hindustani #Kyal #singer #Kirana Gharana #Sawai Gandharva #traditional music #world music #Indian music #vinyl
#India #Bimsen Joshi #Hindustani #Kyal #singer #Kirana Gharana #Sawai Gandharva #traditional music #world music #Indian music #vinyl
#India #Bimsen Joshi #Hindustani #Kyal #singer #Kirana Gharana #Sawai Gandharva #traditional music #world music #Indian music #vinyl
#India #Bimsen Joshi #Hindustani #Kyal #singer #Kirana Gharana #Sawai Gandharva #traditional music #world music #Indian music #vinyl

Bimsen Joshi (1922-2011) was among the greatest and most popular Hindustani Kyal singers of the second half of the 20th century. Though he did not come from a musical family, from a young age he felt such an intense passion for singing that he left his home in Karnakata at the age of 11 for two years in search of a guru in Northern India notably in Gwalior, where he met singer Krishnarao Shankar Pandit (1894–1989)* and sarod master Hafiz Ali Kahn (1888–1972) and began a stringent 12-hour-a-day musical training. Returning home he was accepted by Sawai Gandharva (1886-1952), the most famous disciple of Abdul Karim Khan (1872-1937)*, as his disciple, in 1935. 

The brilliant student began performing and recording shellac 78 RPMs in the early 1940s, crafting a unique singing style influenced by great singers like Begum Akhtar (1914-1974), Kesarbai Kerkar (1892-1977)* and Amir Khan (1912-1974)*. Steeped in the time-honored tradition, Joshi also embodied a changing modern India, playing music that transcended class, cast and religion, by singing bhajan and abhang devotional songs in Kannada, Hindi and Marathi languages which brought him a large nationwide audience.

This second LP, released by the virtuoso in 1961, features Joshi’s powerful voice, dazzling improvisation techniques, and fluid creativity.

In an interview quoted in the English-language periodical India Abroad in 1997, Mr. Joshi explained his eclectic approach to his art.
“For a few years after learning music, I did not sing, I only listened; I heard a lot of music of different kinds,” he said. “This is an education which is as important as practicing music.” He added:
“The singer has to be a great thief. From each person take the best to create your own style.”**

* Listen to these luminaries here

Bimsen Joshi (1922-2011) fût l'un des chanteurs Hindustani de Kyal les plus populaires de la seconde moitié du XXe siècle. Bien que n’étant pas issu d’une famille de musiciens, il éprouve une passion dévorante pour le chant dès son plus jeune âge et quitte même le foyer familial à Karnakata seul à l’âge de 11 ans pendant deux années à la recherche d’un gourou en Inde du nord, notamment à Gwalior, où il rencontre le chanteur Krishnarao Shankar Pandit (1894-1989)* et le maître du sarod Hafiz Ali Kahn (1888-1972). C’est là qu’il s’adonne corps et âme à la musique pendant plus de 12 heures par jour. De retour chez lui, Sawai Gandharva (1886-1952), le plus célèbre disciple du fondateur de l’école Kirana Gharana Abdul Karim Khan (1872-1937)*, l’accepte comme son disciple en 1935.

Le brillant élève commence à se produire en public et à enregistrer des 78 tours à partir du début des années 1940, forgeant un style de chant unique inspiré par des grandes figures comme Begum Akhtar (1914-1974), Kesarbai Kerkar (1892-1977)* et Amir Khan (1912-1974)*. Profondément ancré dans la tradition, Joshi incarnait également une Inde moderne en mutation. Il propose ainsi une musique qui transcende les classes sociales, les castes et les religions, avec notamment des chants bhajans et abhang dévotionnels en kannada, en hindi et en marathi, ce qui lui valut une très grande renommée dans l'ensemble du pays.

Ce second album, publié par le virtuose en 1961, présente sa voix puissante, ses techniques d’improvisation éblouissantes et sa créativité fluide et originale.

* Ecoutez ces grandes figures d'Inde du nord ici


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Photograph below is from Tales of a Parrot by Ziya al-Din Nakhshabi, Cleveland Museum of Art, 1978:
Fourteenth night: The origin of music with a mythical bird with seven holes in its beak, symbolizing the seven notes, acting as the vina player's muse, 16th century. 

MusicRepublic INDIA – INDE  Bhimsen Joshi – His Master's Voice – ECLP 2264


Please help me purchase important traditional records to pursue my global curation            project and share the best finds with you on this blog:



Monday, October 21, 2019

NIGERIA
Ayinla Omowura & his Apala Group  – His Master's Voice Vol. 2 – HNLX 5085, 1971 (LP)
#Nigeria #Yoruba #Ayinla Owomura #Apala #traditional music #African music #world music #talking drums #trance #dance #vinyl
#Nigeria #Yoruba #Ayinla Owomura #Apala #traditional music #African music #world music #talking drums #trance #dance #vinyl
#Nigeria #Yoruba #Ayinla Owomura #Apala #traditional music #African music #world music #talking drums #trance #dance #vinyl
#Nigeria #Yoruba #Ayinla Owomura #Apala #traditional music #African music #world music #talking drums #trance #dance #vinyl

We now share a second rare LP by Ayinla Omowura (1933-1980), the master of a fiery, fast-tempoed Apala, featuring his deep, authoritative voice, powerful backing vocals and spellbinding, multilayered percussions, including iyalu talking drum, agogo bells, sekere rattles, akuba drums, and agidigbo thumb piano.

Nous partageons ici un deuxième album rare d’Ayinla Owomura (1933-1980), le grand maître d'un Apala rapide et fougueux, avec sa voix grave et intense, des chœurs puissants et des percussions polyrythmiques envoûtantes, comprenant des tambours parlants iyalu, des cloches agogo, des hochets sekere, des tambours akuba et un grand piano à pouce agidigbo.
 
   

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Our other Ayinla Owomura Apala share, includes a profile of the artist:

Ayinla Owomura - 25 x40 - Africa Song Ltd NEMI 0515 here

Our other Yoruba Apala shares:
Haruna Ishola & His Apala Group - Star Records SRPS 32 here
Haruna Ishola & His Apala Group - RPS 16 here

Our Yoruba Sakara shares:
Yusufu Olatunji & His Group - Vol. 17 - Philips PL 636 1050 here
Yusufu Olatunji & His Group - Vol. 18 - ORSL 1706 here

Our Yoruba Fuji share:
Sikiru Ayinde Barrister - Fuji Exponent Vol. 8 - AS 46-L here

Our modern Yoruba music share:
King Sunny Adé & His African Beats - Check E - SALPS 26 here


Photograph below is from Yoruba (Visions of Africa) by Babatunde Lawal, 5 Continents, 2012:

Shango priestess, dressed in red, holding double-axe sceptres (Ose Sango); 
photograph by Robert Farris Thompson, Nigeria 1960s.

MusicRepublic NIGERIA Ayinla Omowura & his Apala Group  – His Master's Voice Vol. 2 – HNLX 5085


  Please help me purchase important traditional records to pursue my global curation                              project and share the best finds with you on this blog:




Tuesday, October 15, 2019


BAHRAIN – UNITED ARAB EMIRATES
Pêcheurs de Perles et Musiciens du Golfe Persique – OCORA 42, recorded by Poul Rovsing Olsen, 1962-1963 (LP)
#Bahrain #Sharjah #United Arab Emirates #pearl divers #naham #oud #surnai #tabl #lyre #tanboura #Ocora #traditional music #world music #taqsim #Baluchi #bedouin music #Arabic music #trance #vinyl
#Bahrain #Sharjah #United Arab Emirates #pearl divers #naham #oud #surnai #tabl #lyre #tanboura #Ocora #traditional music #world music #taqsim #Baluchi #bedouin music #Arabic music #trance #vinyl
#Bahrain #Sharjah #United Arab Emirates #pearl divers #naham #oud #surnai #tabl #lyre #tanboura #Ocora #traditional music #world music #taqsim #Baluchi #bedouin music #Arabic music #trance #vinyl
#Bahrain #Sharjah #United Arab Emirates #pearl divers #naham #oud #surnai #tabl #lyre #tanboura #Ocora #traditional music #world music #taqsim #Baluchi #bedouin music #Arabic music #trance #vinyl
#Bahrain #Sharjah #United Arab Emirates #pearl divers #naham #oud #surnai #tabl #lyre #tanboura #Ocora #traditional music #world music #taqsim #Baluchi #bedouin music #Arabic music #trance #vinyl
#Bahrain #Sharjah #United Arab Emirates #pearl divers #naham #oud #surnai #tabl #lyre #tanboura #Ocora #traditional music #world music #taqsim #Baluchi #bedouin music #Arabic music #trance #vinyl

This precious LP, recorded in 1962-1963, offers a rare glimpse into the fascinating traditional music from Bahrain and Sharjah (United Arab Emirates) in the Persian Gulf (aka the Arabian Gulf).

Side A features stunning side-long singing by pearl divers from Muharraq, Bahrain, who have been diving for pearls for more than 4,000 years. By the early 1960’s, when this recording was made, they had almost disappeared following the competition of cultured pearls from Japan in the 1930s, the discovery of oil and the area’s gradual modernization.

As pearl diving was a physically exhausting and perilous job, pearl boats welcomed professional naham lead singers onboard with accompanying musicians playing drums and hand cymbals to encourage and sustain the energy of the divers and their helpers. Nahams sang at top volume, supported by percussion, and the crew responded in deep, low drones (similar to vocal drones in Tibetan Buddhist music), exclamations, clapping, and whistling. These extraordinary trance-like collective worksongs were played uninterrupted from dawn to dusk.

Side B showcases inspired and dense performances highlighting the region’s rich ethnic and cultural diversity:

(B1) Salim Ahmed performing a Taqsim (maqam rast) on the oud lute, Manama (Bahrain);

(B2) Baluchi wedding music featuring a surnai oboe and tabl drum, Sharjah (UAE);

(B3) Kafur Moubarek, lyre (or tanboura) and voice, interpreting a love poem, Manama (Bahrain);
Kafur Moubarek was a Sudanese Bahraini. “Nowadays the lyre is rarely used, except by East Africans; lyres may be found in Saudi Arabia and several sheikhdoms of the Arabian Gulf but the musicians who play them are always Africans of Sudanese origin,” says Poul Rovsing Olsen in the liner notes. (see miniature below).

(B4) Rajab bin Khamis on droneless jirbe bagpipe, and two tabl drums, Manama (Bahrain).

Ce disque précieux, enregistré en 1962-1963, offre un aperçu rare de la remarquable musique traditionnelle de Bahreïn et de Sharjah (Émirats arabes unis) dans le golfe Persique (ou golfe Arabique).

La Face A présente des chants fascinants de plongeurs de perles de Muharraq (Bahreïn) qui pêchaient la perle depuis plus de 4 000 ans. Au début des années 1960, lorsque cet enregistrement fut réalisé, ils avaient presque disparu en raison de la concurrence des perles de culture du Japon dans les années 1930, la découverte de pétrole et de la modernisation progressive de la région.

Comme la pêche à la perle était un travail particulièrement éprouvant et périlleux, les bateaux-perles embarquaient des chanteurs professionnels naham, accompagnés de musiciens jouant du tambour et des cymbales à main pour encourager et soutenir l’énergie des plongeurs et de leurs assistants. Le naham chantait fort, soutenu par des percussions, auquel l’équipage répondait par des bourdons profonds dans l'extrême grave (rappelant les bourdons vocaux que l’on trouve dans la musique bouddhiste tibétaine), des exclamations, des applaudissements et des sifflements. Ces extraordinaires musiques collectives qui mènent à la transe étaient jouées sans interruption de l'aube au crépuscule.

La face B présente des musiques denses et inspirées qui reflètent la riche diversité ethnique et culturelle de la région:

(B1) Salim Ahmed exécutant un Taqsim (maqam rast) sur luth oud a cinq double cordes, Manama (Bahreïn);

(B2) Musique de mariage Baloutchi avec un hautbois surnai et un tambour tabl, Sharjah (Émirats arabes unis);

(B3) Kafur Moubarek, lyre (ou tanboura) et voix, interprétant un poème d'amour, Manama (Bahreïn);
Kafur Moubarek était un Bahreïni soudanais (voir miniature ci-dessous). « De nos jours, la lyre n’est guère utilisée que par les Africains de l'Est ; on trouve des lyres en Arabie Saoudite et dans plusieurs émirats du Golfe mais les musiciens qui s'en servent sont toujours des Africains d'origine Soudanaise, » explique Poul Rovsing Olsen dans les notes de l’album.

(B4) Rajab bin Khamis jouant de la cornemuse jirbe sans bourdon, accompagné de deux tambours tabl, Manama (Bahreïn).



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Our other share of the region's music:
Abu Dhabi/Bahrain - Les Emirats du Golfe Arabique - Disques Alvarès C 471 here

“ONE OF THE MOST MUSICAL CULTURES OF ITS TIME?
The result, demographically and socially, of having professional musicians on so many pearling boats is remarkable. In 1907 J.G. Lorimer stated that Bahrain had 917 boats. If only half of the vessels had two musicians on board, in a population ca 70,000 that would indicate that 1.3 percent of Bahrainis were professional-level musicians. If we go back in time, the proportions are even greater. The Dutch explorer Carsten Niebuhr noted that by 1750 Kuwait actually had 800 pearl diving boats in a population of 10,000. If only 500 of the boats had one nahham, then 5 percent of the population of Kuwait were active musicians. This is a remarkable amount of people devoted to music in a lone community. Comparatively, in the US in 1910, not even a quarter of 1 percent were considered professional musicians (Lorimer 1907; Niehbur 1792, 127; Shamlan 2000, 53; US Census Bureau; U.S. Census of Population). The large proportion of Gulf musicians did not just have an impact on the seamen but also on the greater community. After four months on the pearling boats, musicians returned and were heard by, and influenced, the local residents. (…) Certainly, the Arabian Gulf is historically one of the most musical regions of the Peninsula.”*

*From the fascinating and richly-documented Music and Traditions of the Arabian Peninsula – Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Bahrain, and Qatar by Lisa Urkevich, Routeledge, 2014.


#Bahrain #Sharjah #United Arab Emirates #pearl divers #naham #oud #surnai #tabl #lyre #tanboura #Ocora #traditional music #world music #taqsim #Baluchi #bedouin music #Arabic music #trance #vinyl


#Bahrain #Sharjah #United Arab Emirates #pearl divers #naham #oud #surnai #tabl #lyre #tanboura #Ocora #traditional music #world music #taqsim #Baluchi #bedouin music #Arabic music #trance #vinyl

#Bahrain #Sharjah #United Arab Emirates #pearl divers #naham #oud #surnai #tabl #lyre #tanboura #Ocora #traditional music #world music #taqsim #Baluchi #bedouin music #Arabic music #trance #vinyl


Photograph below is from Mughal Paintings: Art and Stories by Sonya Rhie Quintanilla, Cleveland Museum of Art, 2016:

Lyre player (track B3), presumably Sudanese, Mughal painting, India, c. 1640-1660.

MusicRepublic BAHRAIN – UNITED ARAB EMIRATES Pêcheurs de Perles et Musiciens du Golfe Persique – OCORA 42


Please help me purchase important traditional records to pursue my global curation            project and share the best finds with you on this blog: